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Olaf

For adoption Male dog - Age 5 years - Healthy At the moment he is in a Foster House, but he needs a forever home now.

Hot cars are trouble for dogs

We have all seen dogs and other companion animals who are left inside cars outside of stores while their well meaning guardians "run in for a few minutes." What these otherwise caring people don't realize is that on a hot and humid day, the temperature inside a car rises very quickly

Animal groups make case against Cock fighting

St. Maarten. Members of parliament are split over whether cock fighting should be banned.Several of them made their position clear on Thursday during a central committee meeting that was attended by several animal rights organizations and two veterinarians...

Stop Dogfighting

Dogfighting is a sadistic "contest" in which two dogs specifically bred, conditioned, and trained to fight are placed in a pit (generally a small arena enclosed by plywood walls) to fight each other, for the spectators' gambling and entertainment. Fights average nearly an hour in length and often last more than two hours.

Vegan World

The cruelty of factory farming is well documented, but what is the solution?

Go vegan. Can't we continue eating meat and other animal products and just treat the animals humanely? No, for two reasons...

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Hot cars are trouble for dogs

We have all seen dogs and other companion animals who are left inside cars outside of stores while their well meaning guardians run in for a few minutes. What these otherwise caring people don't realize is that on a hot and humid day, the temperature inside a car rises very quickly. On an 85-degree day, for example, the temperature inside a car with the windows opened slightly can reach 102 degrees within 10 minutes. After 30 minutes, the temperature will reach 120 degrees. On warmer days, it will get even hotter. Every year in Summer, pets left in this situation suffer irreversible brain damage or death.

Is it too hot to take my dog along today?

That's a question we need to ask ourselves every time we drive with a dog. Warm weather can literally be a killer for a dog left inside a car. Did you know that on warm days, the inside of a car heats up very quickly? When it's 85 degrees out, the temperature inside a car even with the windows left slightly open can soar to 102 degrees in 10 minutes, and reach 120 degrees in just half an hour. On hotter days, the temperature will climb even higher. Outside temperatures in the 70s can be dangerous, as well. Even leaving your dog for "just a minute" may be too long. A dog's normal body temperature ranges from 101 to 102.5 degrees. Dogs can withstand a body temperature of 107 to 108 degrees for only a very short period of time before suffering brain damage or even death. It's not cool to leave your dog in a hot car. For more information, visit www.MyDogIsCool.com

Don't leave dogs or any other animal in cars!

With much of the island enduring sweltering temperatures, please allow us to warn readers that parked vehicles are death traps for dogs, cats and any other animal during warm weather. As the weather warms, it's especially important to make sure that your companion dog drinks enough water. Be sure to always bring fresh water and a bowl with you when headed out to the beach, a picnic, hiking, etc. We receive many reports about animals who suffer horrifying deaths in hot cars. On a 78-degree day, the temperature inside a parked car can soar to between 100 and 120 degrees in minutes, and on a 90-degree day, the temperature can reach 160 degrees in less than 10 minutes. Leaving the windows open and/or leaving water in the vehicle does not keep animals safe. Early warning signs: Heavy panting, Heavy salivation, Bright red gums and tongue, Uncoordination, Vomiting and Loss of consciousness in severe cases. Emergency care for dogs with heatstroke: Immediately move your dog to a cool, shaded area. Douse him with cool, not cold, running water and call your vet for advice. He may need to be admitted for oxygen therapy and intravenous fluids.

How to prevent heatstroke:

  • Walk your dog in the early morning and evening to avoid the hottest time of the day
  • Make sure your dog has a cool, shaded place to rest
  • Ensure the water bowl is kept filled up with cool water
  • Clip long haired dogs’ coats and groom them regularly to remove dead undercoat
  • NEVER leave your dog in a car or caravan unattended
  • Avoid long car journeys with your dog in the middle of the day

Dogs cannot cool themselves as efficiently as humans can, and with only hot air to breathe, dogs can succumb to heatstroke in as little as 15 minutes, resulting in brain damage or death. Symptoms include restlessness, excessive thirst, heavy panting, lethargy, lack of appetite and coordination, dark tongue, and vomiting. Leaving a dog or any animal in a parked car is as cruel as putting them in a hot oven. Please, when it's even a little warm outside, leave animals at home. If you see an animal left in a car, have the owner paged or call local police or humane authorities immediately. The dog's life depends on it.

 

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